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Tuesday, January 17, 2012

Google to Murdoch- This is just nonsense

Rupert Murdoch, owner of a world renowned phone hacking newspaper accused Google of making money by slapping ads over pirated content and pouring millions into lobbying, in a tirade in which he also accused the Whitehouse of being in the employment of "Silicon Valley paymasters."  

Well, Google has fired back and called the accusations "nonsense." 

"This is just nonsense," wrote a Google spokeswoman. "Last year we took down 5 million infringing Web pages from our search results and invested more than $60 million in the fight against bad ads...We fight pirates and counterfeiters every day." 

It's nice to see the public row between supporters and opponents of both SOPA and PIPA acts that have the potential to derail some of the fundamental tenets of the free web as we know. Is Murdoch right in his accusation against Google? You be the judge.

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Monday, January 16, 2012

Meet the Intel Atom Powered Android Phone- Lenovo K800

We're not far off into the time when x86 based chipsets will power smartphones. With the demo of the Lenovo K800 running Android at the just ended CES 2012, we can only wait for the  time when the difference between the power of our smartphone and desktop computers become incredibly blurred.  



 

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Sunday, January 15, 2012

Windows Phone 7? 5 Reasons Why I Have no Faith in it


In my last and final goodbye to Nokia, a commeter asked the question, "what about Windows Phone 7?" Indeed, all throughout the post, there was not one mention of Microsoft's answer to both Android and iOS. Is it because I think WP7 is no match for the two dominant OSs? Or that because it's from Microsoft? I don't think so. WP7 for me, is not a viable contender for the following reasons


1. Lateness: I really don't know what Redmond was doing when Google bought Android Inc back in 2005 or when Steve Jobs introduced the iPhone back in 2007, but somehow they chose to turn a blind eye to the then budding ultra smartphone market and instead concentrate more on their desktop offering. As the adage goes, the early bird catches the worm, and both Google and Apple were those early birds. If Redmond had thrown down its gauntlet at that time with the introduction of WP7 then, at least they would stand a chance today.


2. Miscrosoft bullying: Rather than focus time and resources on marketing and making WP7 attractive to both developers and those who don't want either iOS or Android, Microsoft prefers to spend its energy on  bullying Android OEMs into paying so called royalties for infringing never-shown Microsoft patents. But there's no surprise here, it's one of Microsoft's hallmarks to use the bogus patent system as a trump card if it cannot compete. 


3. Nokia: Perhaps the biggest reason why WP7 will find it tough on the market is the unholy alliance with Nokia. For years, Nokia had been a company known to make profits by selling high volume, low cost "dumb" phones to hundreds of millions of people across the world. Now with WP7, it will have to focus on the highend spectrum of the market. With Elop giving Symbian just a few years more for "harvesting," Nokia is left with WP7 as its primary OS. We don't know when Meltemi will finally take the place of Symbian, but for now, we can safely assume Nokia is going to alienate its core market. 


To also hammer home the point of Nokia being a disaster for WP7, take a look at the press coverage the release of the N9 and N950 MeeGo powered devices enjoyed and compare them to the Nokia Lumia, even Engadget, an ultra Apple centric blog was drooling over the N9. The Lumia? Yawn. The market logically expected Nokia to overhaul Symbian and fire up MeeGo, not sell out to Redmond.


4. Apps, apps and apps: The Apple App Store and Android Markets both have hundreds of thousands of apps available for download. Think of anything and you're likely to find an app for that in those two markets. WP7 is yet to catch up, and with Microsoft busily suing other OEMs rather than go all out to attract developers, it's going to take an eternity for WP7 to reach the scale of Android and iOS in terms of apps. 


5. The OEMs just love Android: Why? Because it gives them the power to differentiate themselves completely from their competitors. Given its open nature, it is always easy and safe to model Android into anything one can think of, an example being what Amazon did with it on its Kindle Fire tablets. Which company would not love such an offering? It's little wonder that even the home pages of almost all the device makers  readily feature Android phones, with WP7 a few clicks down the menu. I don't know the extent of customization Microsoft allows the OEMs, but it sure will not be on the scale Google gives them with Android. 


There could be even more reasons why it's going to be a monumentous act for WP7 to climb out of the bottom, but from where I sit, these are the 5 basic reasons I see which work well against Microsoft's comeback in the mobile spectrum.

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Saturday, January 14, 2012

A Final Goodbye to Nokia and a Hello to Android

Just a little over a year ago, I detailed why I opted for Nokia's Maemo powered N900 instead of an Android device. To be precise, I purchased my Nokia N900 on the 4th of Jan 2011, and wow, what an excitement it was to hold such an incredible device. A full blown, Debian based GNU/Linux OS in my pocket.

However, it was not long to be before the groundbreaking, expertly leaked burning platform memo to Engadget and the subsequent Elopcalypse of Feb 11 2011. For long time Nokia loyalists like yours truly, it was like a dream shattered. We'd always dreamed of having MeeGo as the third force in a fiercely competitive arena dominated by the two tech giants of North America: Google with their Android offering and Apple with iOS.

But the all knowing Nokia board knew better. To salvage Nokia from its not so desperate situation, they had to bring in a former Microsoft employee to head a company that was at the forefront of pushing GNU/Linux to millions of people around the world. And as was expected, the inevitable happened: the bringing to its knees of one of the most powerful and recognized technology companies on Earth. 


Using the N900 is an experience worth savoring. But the device was rapidly ageing(aged?) given it only shipped with 256MB of RAM, Nokia had discontinued support for it, leaving only the very wonderful Maemo community on their own, new applications rarely got published among a myriad of other factors. Thus I felt the need for a new device, and quite naturally I opted for Android this time around.


Of course I know of the Nokia N9 and N950 both running MeeGo, but with the frantic effort Nokia's CEO is making to sabotage the success of the those devices, I logically shunned them, fearing Espoo will pull another N900 on users of those two phones. 


You're wondering what device I went for right? Haha. I opted for the Motorola Atrix. After a long and careful searching and considering the price range of the various devices on the retail market here in Accra Ghana, I opted to go for the Atrix which is both a good bang for the money.


Retailing at $400 on Amazon, it packs all the goodies of a modern Android device (yea well not considering the slew of devices being announced at CES 2012). Running Gingerbread on an Nvidia Tegra 2 Dual-core 1 GHz Cortex-A9 with 1GB of RAM, it's more than adequate for an intensive mobile user like myself. 


As I've stated before, the Nokia N900 was my last Nokia device, until perhaps Elop is fired and the Nokia board wakes up and realizes gallows they're being led into, it's a goodbye Nokia and all your offerings and hello Android. It was really nice knowing you, Nokia, for more than 10 solid years of my less than 3 decades old. 



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